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Tech blog on web, security & embedded
The other day I came across Diplomat, an opinionated tool that makes a lot of choices for you. If you've read my previous post in this series, you'll have seen that that can be quite valuable. If you haven't read the previous article yet, do so before continuing to read this one, as it'll help you appreciate the concepts in this post, and it introduces the example as well.

As part of the development of our Precision Time Protocol implementation, Statime, we want to know how it performs compared to other implementations of PTP.

To figure this out, last April we visited VSL, the Dutch National Metrology Institute. There, we performed comparitive precision tests between Statime and Linux PTP.

Will Rust still exist, and have proper support, 10, 20 or even 30 years from now? We’ve been asked this question multiple times in the last year. It is a fair question, as adopting any new technology requires an investment and comes with uncertainties, one of them being the durability of the technology. This article explains why we expect Rust to stand the test of time.
Let's be frank: Rust is a cool language, but there's not a chance I'm introducing it in my company if I can't get any engineers for it. We'll stick with technologies with a much healthier job market.
June 10, 2024

Tock binary size

Tock is a powerful and secure embedded operating system. While Tock was designed with resource constraints in mind, years of additional features, generalizing to more platforms, and security improvements have brought resource, and in particular, code size bloat.
PTP was originally designed for networks in which all devices were ultimately trusted. In version 1, no security mechanism was present, and version 2 only provided an experimental mechanism. However, with version 2.1 of the PTP standard (IEEE 1588-2019) there is now a normative security mechanism in section 16.14.
June 7, 2024

Mix in Rust with C

So, you've just read my previous post on Rust interoperability in general, and now you're curious about how to actually apply the concepts to your situation. You've come to the right place, because in this post and the two that follow, I'll demonstrate how to make Rust and C talk to each other.
June 6, 2024

Mix in Rust

What does it actually mean to introduce Rust in an existing project, and having it communicate with other languages in the code base? This article launches a series of blog posts that provide guidance for introducing Rust into your code base step by step.
The internet has a hole at the bottom of its trust stack, and we need to do something about it. In particular, the internet needs secure time synchronization to fortify the security of our digital world. In this article, we present a path towards the adoption of securely synchronized time.
Messing around with people's clocks can be a great source of practical jokes. Even nowadays, with many people getting their time digitally, this is not as impossible as you might think. (And the month of April, with the switch to summer time and April Fool's Day, provided the perfect timing for this experiment, of course...)
The number of data centers worldwide is constantly increasing, and so is their electricity consumption. One way to become more power-efficient is certainly the constant development of better hardware, but we as developers should do our share. This post shows how coding in Rust can help to use existing resources more efficiently, to help preserve our planet — at least a little bit.
When sudo-rs development started, we added several dependencies using Rust’s crates ecosystem to quickly ramp up development. During development we accrued approximately 135 transitive (direct and indirect) dependencies. Once this was identified, we managed to reduce our total dependencies down to three. In this blog, we explain why and how we did this.
Our tagline reads “Software must become safer”, and for good reason; We feel very strongly about this. But it does lead to the obvious and fair question: “What exactly do you do to ensure that the software your teams produce is safe and secure?”
At the end of 2022, we announced the creation of Rust 101, a university course that introduces students of computer science to Rust. Initially, the course was created for the Faculty of Informatics and Information Technologies at STU Bratislava (FIIT), but from the start we've wanted to create an open-source, modular and reusable set of teaching resources. Having now achieved that milestone, it is time for a new announcement: Rust 101 has evolved to teach-rs.
In February of 2024, I was invited by Matthias Endler of Corrode to join him on his podcast Rust in Production. We discussed how Tweede golf uses Rust in production, to ensure the safety and security of critical infrastructure software.

While using a full-blown filesystem for storing your data in non-volatile memory is common practice, those filesystems are often too big, not to mention annoying to use, for the things I want to do. My solution?

I've been hard at work creating the sequential-storage crate. In this blog post I'd like to go over what it is, why I created it and what it does.

Asynchronous programming is pretty weird. While it is straightforward enough to understand in principle (write code that looks synchronous, but may be run concurrently yada yada yada), it is not so obvious how and when async functions actually perform work. This blog aims to shed light on how that works in Rust.

At Tweede golf we're big fans of creating applications on embedded devices with Rust and we've written a lot about it.

But if you're a hardware vendor (be it chips or full devices/systems), should you give your users Rust support in addition to your C support?

In this blog I argue that the answer to the question is yes.

In Dutch we have a saying 'meten is weten', which translates to 'to measure is to know'. That sentiment is frequently overlooked in setting up computers and networks.
Ever wanted to have a quickly put together command-line tool to delete large chunks of your project automatically? Me neither, but my colleague Marc made a pretty convincing argument as to why such a tool could be useful. So we went ahead and made it. Here are the results.
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