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Embedded & IoT

Potential improvements for Rust embedded abstractions

Lars
Lars

Recently, we worked on an embedded (STM32) project in Rust and we got some hands-on experience with the abstractions commonly used for that. There's embedded-hal, which offers abstractions related to timing, GPIO pins and common communication peripherals like SPI and USART. There's also multiple stm32xxx-hal crates which offer abstractions over most of the peripherals of different STM32 CPU families. Although many of them were nice to use, we found some parts to be lacking and we'd like to propose some potential improvements to embedded-hal and its implementing crates.

Rust, my first embedded language (1/5)

Marlon
Marlon

First-up is Henk Dieter, backend developer at Tweede golf. He has been interested in Rust for quite some time. Actually, it’s how Henk Dieter found out about Tweede golf, as it was one of the first companies in the Netherlands to adopt Rust as their weapon of choice.

The promise of Rust async-await for embedded

Wouter
Wouter

Typically embedded devices are developed using C++. At Tweede golf we have chosen to use Rust instead for implementing our embedded devices. This is controversial as the embedded hardware field is generally quite conservative. Convincing our clients to adopt Rust for their products can be a challenge.

Why Rust is a great fit for embedded software

Henk Dieter
Henk Dieter

Rust is nice for a lot of things. At Tweede golf we've been using the language primarily for high-performance web applications. But that's not all Rust can do. Rust can be used to write embedded applications as well.

Making embedded robust with Rust

Lars
Lars

Embedded software has an issue that most software doesn't: It can be very hard to get it patched. Sometimes a device hangs 5 meters high on a street light in the middle of a highway in another country. Sometimes a device is attached to a customer's heart. Sometimes strict validation requirements make changes to the software very expensive. In each case it is important to build software that doesn't fail, even in unpredictable conditions.