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Tech blog on web, security & embedded

When conducting a penetration test (also known as a hack test) on a website, one of the first things that will catch my eye is the configured (or better, not-configured) security headers on the targeted website. Security headers are a defense-in-depth#Information_security) measure, in the form of response headers, that let the browser know what is allowed and what is not. Browsers will respect the rules defined by these headers and thereby protect visitors from client-side attacks and potentially leaking sensitive information.

When iHub's Bernard van Gastel asked us to help them start with Rust, we were somewhat surprised by their bold step but absolutely happy to assist. In this article we'll describe how we went about designing a workshop for the iHub team.

Sending documents over the internet can be a pain. Email providers generally support attachments with a maximum size between 10 and 50 MB, for larger files one would need to find another way. Most people would probably use one of the many public cloud or file sender solutions. But what if the files to be sent contain personal information, medical information or are private family photos? And how do you know that only the recipient can access and download these files?

It is common wisdom that one should avoid implementing their own cryptography if at all possible. This is generally good wisdom as writing correct cryptography code can be very tricky and takes quite a bit of time to get done right.

You might have seen the logo above on your identity card or passport. If you have it on there, then your card contains a NFC chip that allows it to be read by a computer. This way airport customs is supposed to more securely determine if your passport is really yours. But of course we could also try to read it ourselves with our own NFC reader.

David is Tweede golf's newest addition, and not just any addition, he combines his work as a software engineer with a PhD in theoretical high energy physics. Specialized in the field of privacy and security, David brings a lot of knowledge to the team. For 2021 we were on the look-out to strengthen our expertise in this domain. David joining the team is just that!

KubiKey as a project started out with one main goal: streamline and make more secure the process of accessing the kubernetes cluster used by Tweede golf.

With the current pandemic situation, it is hard to hold meetings at an appropriate and safe distance. Looking for secure alternatives, our local city government approached Tweede golf with developing a novel authenticated variant of videoconferencing, with the intention of holding city council meetings using this solution.

At Tweede golf I've been working with Rust a lot lately. My interest in Rust has been there for years, so I was very happy to start applying it in my working life, about a year ago. Since then I have worked with Rust both for our clients as well as employing it for our operations setup. I have also experimented with Rust for web \[1\]. Until now however we did not contribute to the Rust ecosystem. About time that we get our feet wet and publish our first crate!